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Plant Genus of the family Poaceae

Genus Description Cultivation
Achnatherum
Aegilops
Agrohordeum
Agropyron
Agrostis
Aira
Alopecurus
Ammophila
Amphicarpum
Andropogon
Anisantha
Anthoxanthum
Apera
Aristida
Arrhenatherum
Arthraxon
Arundinaria
Arundo
Aspris
Atheropogon
Avena
Avenella
Avenochloa
Avenula
Bambusa The Malay name bambu for these giant grasses was adopted by Linnaeus for the name of this genus, which now consists of about 120 species, the majority from tropical and subtropical Asia but with a smaller group from tropical America. They are all medium to large, ranging from about 15 ft (4.5 m) to 80 ft (24 m) in height, with smooth cylindrical stems rising in dense compact clumps from a tangled mass of thick short rhizomes. In most species the stems are hollow except at the nodes; from all but the lowest few nodes wiry lateral branches emerge bearing the leaves, the shape and texture of which betray bamboo?s membership of the huge grass family. A conspicuous feature is the large pale scale-leaves that sheath the young stems, which are cast off as each stem matures. Flowering is rarely seen in these bamboos and even when they do flower, at long and irregular intervals, the slender, arching flowering branches may hardly be noticed. Some species exhibit the phenomenon of gregarious flowering, in which plants of the one species or clone set seed and flower simultaneously all around the world, and may afterwards die. Together with other bamboo genera, Bambusa provides a wealth of products: the ?timber? of many species is used for constructing houses, boats, bridges, fences and furniture, among other items, while several provide edible bamboo shoots (though Phyllostachys is more important for the latter use). CULTIVATION: They are vigorous growers once established, but most require a tropical or subtropical climate. However, there are several species that are frost hardy to varying degrees, some surviving winter temperatures as low as 10.4?F (?12?C). All species appreciate a deep, fertile, loamy soil with ample water supply in summer and a sheltered but sunny position, but they will survive and sometimes grow well under more adverse conditions. Propagation is normally by offsets, consisting of at least one fully grown and hardened stem cut off where its rhizome segment branches from an older rhizome and shortened to 3 to 4 nodes above ground level; bury the offset in soil or a large container, flood with water, mulch the soil and apply fertilizer as soon as new growth shows. For some species a long length of stem will sprout and root at the nodes if buried horizontally.
Beckmannia
Bothriochloa
Bouteloua
Brachiaria
Brachyelytrum
Briza
Bromelica
Bromopsis
Bromus
Buchloe
Bulbilis
Calamagrostis
Calammophila
Calamovilfa
Capriola
Catabrosa
Catapodium
Cenchrus
Ceratochloa
Chaetochloa
Chasmanthium
Chloris
Chondrosum
Chrysopogon
Cinna
Coix
Cornucopiae
Corynephorus
Critesion
Crypsis
Cylindropyrum
Cynodon
Cynosurus
Dactylis
Dactyloctenium
Danthonia
Dasypyrum
Deschampsia
Desmazeria
Diarina
Diarrhena
Dichanthelium
Dichanthium
Digitaria
Diplachne
Distichlis
Echinochloa
Eleusine
Elyhordeum
Elymordeum
Elymus
Elytesion
Elytrigia
Eragrostis
Eremopyrum
Erianthus
Eriochloa
Eriocoma
Eulalia
Eustachys
Festuca
Festulolium
Glyceria
Graphephorum
Gymnopogon
Haynaldia
Heleochloa
Helictotrichon
Hemarthria
Hesperostipa
Hierochloe
Holcus
Homalocenchrus
Hordeum
Hystrix
Koeleria
Korycarpus
Leersia
Leptochloa
Leptoloma
Lerchenfeldia
Leymus
Lolium
Lophochloa
Lophopyrum
Manisuris
Megastachya
Melica
Mibora
Microstegium
Milium
Miscanthus
Molinia
Muhlenbergia
Nardus
Nassella
Nazia
Neeragrostis
Nothoholcus
Oryzopsis
Panicularia
Panicum
Pappophorum
Parapholis
Pascopyrum
Paspalum
Pennisetum
Phalaris
Phalaroides
Phippsia
Phleum
Pholiurus
Phragmites
Piptatherum
Piptochaetium
Poa
Polypogon
Pseudoroegneria
Pseudosasa
Puccinellia
Redfieldia
Roegneria
Rostraria
Rottboellia
Saccharum
Sasa This is a genus of about 40 species of small to medium-sized bamboos that are native to eastern Asia and Japan. They have running rhizomes and broad finely toothed leaves. The stems have a waxy white bloom at the nodes. CULTIVATION: These bamboos should be grown in a damp rich soil in partial shade. As these plants spread rapidly, careful siting is needed or they can be confined in a large container. Propagation is usually by division in spring.
Savastana
Schedonnardus
Schizachne
Schizachyrium
Sclerochloa
Scleropoa
Secale
Sesleria
Setaria
Sitanion
Sorghastrum
Sorghum
Spartina
Sphenopholis
Sporobolus
Stipa
Syntherisma
Taeniatherum
Terrellia
Terrelymus
Thinopyrum
Torresia
Torreyochloa
Tragus
Trichachne
Trichloris
Tridens
Triodia
Triplasis
Tripsacum
Trisetum
Triticum
Uniola
Urochloa
Vahlodea
Valota
Ventenata
Vulpia
Zea
Zizania
Zizaniopsis
Zoysia



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