October 21
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Plant Genus of the family Crassulaceae

Genus Description Cultivation
Aeonium A genus of around 30 species of often shrubby and woody-stemmed succulents with terminal rosettes of fleshy leaves. While centered on the Canary Islands and Madeira, representatives of the genus can also be found in eastern and northern Africa and in the Middle East. Their branches, often arranged rather like a multi-headed candlestick, are brittle and covered with a papery bark that sometimes peels from around the base of the stems. Pyramidal inflorescences of tiny flowers, usually yellow but sometimes pink, red or white, develop in the centers of the rosettes and are followed by brown seed heads that are not very attractive and which are best removed. CULTIVATION: As with most succulents, aeoniums are very drought tolerant once established. They demand full sun and perfect drainage, and in the wild can often be found precariously balanced on the most precipitous slopes with their roots anchored in the crevices between rocks. They are easily propagated by removing rooted basal suckers, by treating the rosettes as cuttings or raised from seed.
Anacampseros
Bulliarda
Chetyson
Clausenellia
Crassula This genus in the Crassulaceae family consists of around 300 species of annual, biennial and perennial herbs and small shrubs. A few species are found naturally in Asia, Madagascar and Africa, but the great majority are native to South Africa. The leaves are usually opposite, fleshy and vary in size, texture, color and shape. The red, pink, green or white flowers are star or funnel-shaped, occasionally tubular, and are carried as single flowers but more often in cyme-like branches. CULTIVATION: Cultivated for their ornamental value, they are best grown in full sun. Only a few species need indirect light or shading. Grow in well-drained average soil with added humus. In areas with frost at any time this genus is best grown under glass. Water sparingly during winter. In pots a cactus compost with added grit will be suitable. Propagate by taking stem cuttings or set single leaves into soil from spring to mid-summer. Sow seeds into seed trays or pots of cactus compost with added sharp sand.
Hydrophila
Hylotelephium
Jovibarba
Oreosedum
Penthorum
Petrosedum
Rhodiola
Sedum
Sempervivum
Spathulata
Tillaea
Tillaeastrum



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